35 thoughts on “The Tract Bin”

    1. Well said. This works on so many levels. And it is so very true. Most Gospel tracts actually diminish the Gospel so much that there is nothing satisfying in them. The only one satisfied is the person who gave the tract away.

      1. My wife likes to leave tracts, probably because her grandfather (who was an evangelist) emphasized that.

        Me? I don’t. And unless I am with my wife, I won’t.

        First, tracts are associated with cheap tipping. I try to tip generously. No need to send mixed messages. Now my wife’s grandfather (“Papa”) tipped generously. But most other “Christian”s don’t, I am afraid. The reputation is deserved, even if there are several Christians out there who do tip well.

        Second, tracts almost always cheapen the gospel. They reduce salvation down to a prayer, and they almost never deal with the real issues people face. A tract on depression I read once said that depression could be cured by trusting Christ! That is a load of ***p.

        If there is one thing the Scriptures plainly teach, it is that people meet the Savior in different ways, in different circumstances and accept him in different ways as well. The response of Zaccheus to Christ was not the response of the sinner in the temple, nor the response of John or of Peter. None of them followed the Romans Road.

        We have tried to Standardize the Gospel experience. We think we know it all. We put God in a box. We treat the Faith as something to be Marketed and Advertised for Sale. People try to design tracts using advertising principles.

        I confess to being sick of the whole thing.

    1. Oh, you made me literally LOL with that one. I checked out Jack Chick’s site the other day and realized that he may be single-handedly responsible for condemning every toy or cartoon I had ever hoped to enjoy as a child. I never understood why I wasn’t allowed to buy a Spider-Man comic book, but I was allowed to pick up the Jack Chick comic book that had a witch’s dismembered head talking in it.

  1. All I can hear is Homer Simpson: “Mmmm, free Gospel tracts.”
    These are better news than many of the tracts I have seen in my life which supposedly speak of Good News.

    1. I used to work at a Chinese restaurant. It was in the suburbs and owned by people from Chinatown. The kitchen staff would make meals for themselves that looked nothing at all like the stuff on the menu. What you get in most Chinese restaurants is about as authentic as genuine imitation pleather.

      1. I was taken to a Western Buffet in Beijing by a friend once. I now know what Chinese think when they go to a Chinese Buffet here in the States. “Well, yes. It does somewhat resemble food from home. Sort of.”

  2. That menu is not King James. Burn it. I am pretty sure that if you add the digits of the phone numbers and divide by 666 you will get a number that spells SATAN on your phone keys. Gail Riplinger is probably doing the math as we speak.

  3. Are you hungry? Do you have an empty feeling inside? Then accept General Tso’s chicken into your stomach as your personal overlord and savor.
    Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, he will get home delivery (cash only no checks)

    1. It’s as easy as A-B-C!

      *Accept that you’re an hungered.
      *Believe that food will fill the empty hole in your tummy.
      *Call upon the Golden Corner (now with convenient fax option).

  4. DARREL! I’ve been craving Chinese food all day and then you had to go and post this! ::cries::
    (Why didn’t I just get Chinese food? Because the high today was 1 above, and I’m not wiling to subject other people to weather that I myself am not willing to drive in.) Now that my ranting is over . . .

    Is that a fundamental trifecta? Tracts tucked in with Chinese menus, with a Spanish translation sign. I suppose we should be grateful that the tracts were left in lieu of tips.

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