The Obligatory Yearly Hating Santa Post

Santa

This year’s edition comes from Terry Watkins at Jesus-Is-Savior.com wherein we learn that the New Age Religions (whatever they are) have some deity or another named “Sanat Kumara” which is apparently somehow relevant. Fascinating stuff.

Any article about Santa that includes quotes from Texe Marrs has to be good, right?

218 thoughts on “The Obligatory Yearly Hating Santa Post”

  1. Laugh all you like – we’ll see who is laughing when Jesus comes back. How can you expect your children to believe Jesus when you teach them Satanic Lies? Oh right, you probably believe in some New Age fake homosexual “Jesus” who loves all this stuff. I will pray that you repent before the real Jesus comes back and you see “santa” leading you to hell.

      1. It’s surprisingly hard to keep the poesonality up.

        (Resemblance to real people, including the author in previous years, is unfortunately not accidental.)

    1. @Proud Fundy: Yeah. But are you waiting for Santa to come down your chimney? You don’t want to piss him off do you?

      We’ll see who is laughing when Santa comes back and you are left behind. No gifts. Zero. Zip. Nada.

        1. The double entendre was no accident. I know how to strike fear into the fundy heart. No rapture for you dude.

    2. @ProudFundamentalist, if you want people to truly forsake lies, your attitude must be one that will not deter them.

      :arrow: “…gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.” Titus 3:2

      :arrow: “And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient,” 2 Tim 2:24

      :arrow: “But we were gentle among you, even as a nurse cherisheth her children:” 1 Thess 2:7

      :arrow: “But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.” James 3:17

      Respectfully,
      Todd

  2. Dear Terry Watkins:

    Ze 2:6 is an appeal to the exilic community.

    If you seriously believe that this somehow references Santa Claus, you have admitted that you have zero competence to teach. And if you have no competence as a teacher of God’s word [as your screed demonstrates amply], why should we listen?

    Christian Socialist

  3. @ProudFundamentalist:

    Two problems here:

    1. Your Pride
    2. Your broken system of man-made traditions

    This is all I have to say on this post.

    B.R.O.

  4. What gets me every time I read one of these rants is, why “modern Santa Claus is not a good thing” must IMMEDIATELY go to DEMONS IDOLATRY CONSPIRACY SATANNNNN. If you don’t like the Santa Claus tradition, read about the real St. Nicholas–champion of the poor, the oppressed, and the lost, agitator for justice, and speaker of truth to power–and celebrate him instead!

    Oh wait, he was probably a librul. :roll:

    1. You socialist!!

      And not only was he too liberal…he is considered a saint by the Catholic Church who we all know is the great whore of babylon in Revelation…..

      If there is any fun to be had, any reason for joy, fundies seem to be able to find the demon under the rock which is going to destroy everything.

      Could you imagine if the shepherds were fundies when the angels came out singing glory in the highest? “We only sing hymns–none of this modern stuff!”

    2. “If you don’t like the Santa Claus tradition, read about the real St. Nicholas–champion of the poor, the oppressed, and the lost, agitator for justice, and speaker of truth to power”

      Also – Puncher in the mouth of heretics. :cool:

  5. At what point (hypothetically, of course) in the commercialization of Christmas does the present-giving fat guy become a distracting concept? Or maybe Santa the deceiver is himself deceived and comes down the chimney two weeks too early. Only pagans celebrate Christmas in December, right?

    1. Saint Nicholas’ Day is actually December 6 (December 19 in the Orthodox calendar), so if Santa comes on Christmas Eve, he’s late.

      1. We do St. Nicholas’ Day on Dec. 6. My Greek Orthodox church uses the so-called “New Calender” for most feasts, so that’s what we do. To clarify, all Orthodox celebrate St. Nick’s Day on Dec. 6. It’s just that Old Calenderists use the Julian calender rather than the (modified) Gregorian that the New Calenderists use. So Julian Dec. 6 is Gregorian Dec. 19. And there are serious conflicts over the calender issue. Charges of heresy. Breaking of communion. The calender is Holy Tradition! Is outrage to change it! Wait, this isn’t clarifying anything. Welcome to Orthodoxy.

        Anyway. The kids put their shoes out and we fill them with candy, fruit, little dollar toys, etc. For some reason, even the older kids get more excited about this than they do for Christmas. Fine with me. A shoe full of candy is a hell of a lot cheaper than a bike or Playstation.

        1. Oh Nico, I miss the Onion Dome and Father Vasiliy!!! (sp?) Why did it shut down? Is outrage! Was it shutting down in 19th-century Russia?

        2. You made my day, Gate-Crasher! I was certain no one would get the Fr. Vasily reference. Yes, is outrage! I’m not sure what was going on with Alex, but he shut down The Onion Dome, opened a new blog (called 19th Century Russia or something like that), didn’t do much with it, and now there is a new and improved The Onion Dome. The current postings are Saints of the Day mixed with the usual satire. Very well done if you care to take a look!

        3. Nico, when I said the Orthodox churches observe Saint Nicholas Day on December 19, I thought about going into the Gregorian vs. Julian calendar business and how some Orthodox churches use one and some the other, but I decided that would be more confusing than clarifying for people who didn’t already know about it. Thank you for agreeing with me. :wink:

        4. :smile: Indeed! I’ve often thought that Maslow’s hierarchy of needs should have included the need for controversy. Human beings seem to be discontented and unfulfilled unless there is something to raise a stink about!

        5. :D I thought everybody knew about the Onion Dome. Thanks so much for the update. So glad to hear it’s back online…I will check it out!

    1. This brief excerpt from that article sums up to me why Darrell came up with SFL. Insert any fundy standard for the observance of Christmas in the following quote and you’ll see how well it applies:

      “In fact, if the ‘Christmas is pagan’ crowd merely presented their argument as ‘opinion,’ there would be no urgent need to respond. But it is the fact that they condemn Christmas observers as guilty of idolatry and, and in some cases, suggest that Christians who do Christmas are risking their salvation that is just too much. For in so doing they are binding Christian consciences and robbing Christians of their God-given freedom, making unnecessary matters necessary.”

    1. OW! My eyes!

      What do these people think makes a website attractive, anyway?

      And if this is a POE, it is a mighty good one.

      The Big Problem is that someone, an honest seeker, might come across this site and think it represents what real Christians think. Seeing how poisonous it is, most honest people would reject it, and the “gospel” that comes with it.

      Frankly, I do not blame them. We have to remember that we are not only the messengers, but we are also the message. If the Gospel is not written in our hearts and lives for people to see, they can hardly be faulted for rejecting the words.

  6. For people without the faith, I can understand why they enjoy Santa but I don’t think it is just a fundamentalist view to want to exalt Jesus Christ during this time of year. In regards to being a conspiracy theorist, that is another story.

    Many churches partake in Advent to celebrate Jesus Christ by making him the focus rather than the commercialized focus of Santa etc. Do I think Santa is part of a new age religion? No, but I do think Jesus should be the focus if this is to be the time of the year where Christians are to celebrate his first advent. :grin:

  7. OK, I got curious and looked up Sanat Kumara. Please note that I have zero familiarity with any of this, so I’m trying to parse it in a way that my liturgical Protestant mind can understand. My apologies to anybody who knows better and spots a howler. Fasten your seat belts, this may be a bumpy ride.

    OK, so the thought-framework of Hinduism is laid out in texts called the Upanishads, which are sort-of-kind-of analogous to the Wisdom Books of the Bible. The oldest were written down in the 6th century BC or earlier. People called rishis and rishikas appear in the Upanishads. They are sort of scripture writers, sort of prophets, sort of saints. Chapter 7 of one of the oldest Upanishads, the Chandogya Upanishad, relays some religious or philosophical instructions by a rishi named Sanatkumara. Sanatkumara also composed a samhita (hymnal? psalter? liturgy?) named after him, and furthermore he is described as one of the four or seven spiritual sons of the god Brahma in texts written later than the Chandogya Upanishad.

    So, okay, there are 108 multi-chapter Upanishads, more samhitas than I was able to count, and I don’t know how many rishis and rishikas mentioned in Hindu religious writings–and he wasn’t the only son of Brahma either. Why fixate on this man? And having fixated on him, why assign this 2500-year-plus-old Hindu religious personage to “New Age Religions?”

    My guess: Because the Theosophists adopted him. Theosophy used to be theology with a strong streak of religious mysticism, but it veered further and further from mainstream theology over the centuries. Helena Blavatsky turned it into a thing into which one had to be initiated back in 1875 and started picking interesting bits out of Indian, Chinese, etc., religious thought to add to it. Blavatsky taught that mainstream religious history was wrong, that there was a secret religious history of the world that had been kept and passed on by the people who really knew the truth, and that (naturally) she was one of them. A group of “Ascended Masters” ran the world for the world’s good, and one of them was Sanat Kumara (note the spelling).

    The Theosophical Society is about as New Age as it gets–but, again, why pick on this one dude from this one particular strain of New Age thought?

    Then I clicked the Image link. Sanatkumara means “Eternal Youth” and Sanatkumara/Sanat Kumara is often portrayed by both Hindus and Theosophists either as a young man with white hair . . . or as a guy who looks a lot like a vigorously fit Santa Claus.

    But all this still doesn’t explain how Terry Watkins even found out about Sanatkumara/Sanat Kumara in the first place. Shouldn’t he be staying far, far away from that stuff? Like, if he even reads about it it will magically make him believe in it, or something?

    Yeah, but if you already believe that the ability to rearrange S-A-N-T-A to read S-A-T-A-N means something, and you are online a lot, it isn’t a stretch to try Googling S-A-N-A-T to see what comes up. The Wikipedia entry on Sanat Kumara the Ascended Master is the second link in the results.

    Hey, Terry Watkins, if you’re reading this: The first link in the results is to an album of Christian religious music from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. It’s titled Sanat because that’s Finnish for “words” and Latin for “heals,” and the album is by a Finnish group that often sings in Church Latin. How about ranting about that? The group is called Rajaton, which is Finnish for “boundless,” but I’m sure you could get some mileage out of Rajaton, rajah, India, New Age, SATANNNN.

    Or you could listen to the music on the album and see whether your heart grows three sizes this year.

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