30 thoughts on “Steal Away”

  1. We sang this in Rejoice Singers with director Joe Mims. I believe he arranged the version we sang. Hats off to the amazing teachers that made life more fun, and experiences like choir that were off the charts fun.

      1. I guess that was after he taught at PCC. He left the summer after my freshman year, and we didn’t know he was leaving. He was a wonderful choir director. Such a nice family.

  2. Pretty good. I have this on a CD with a men’s a capella group doing it — that’s my favorite rendition of this song.

  3. I needed this after some Hamblin’, uh… ummm… well, it ain’t “preaching”; I’m not sure what to call it.

  4. “Steal away to Jesus” – away from legalism, away from condemnation, away from always striving to attain the righteousness Christ has already freely given to us. “To Jesus” – the Jesus described in the Gospels, who loved sinners, who cared for people’s needs, who was gentle with the outcasts but harsh with the arrogant, who loved us to death and back.

  5. No doubt there’s a 30 point sermon that can be found in there somewhere!!

    All you have to do is have The Call the be sensitive enough as a MOG to see what the Speerit is laying upon your heart.

  6. I may have mentioned this before, but this lovely song is one of those that reputedly was a liberation song disguised as a Gospel hymn. To “steal away home” was to escape from a slave owner.

    I can’t prove that it’s true, but i like to think that these songs had an origin in the struggle for freedom (as well as righteousness).

    1. I was taught that it meant for groups of slaves to escape to Canada. The cue for the timing was ” He calls me by the thunder,” meaning, “we go when it rains.”

      That rendition was beautiful!

      1. Its harder to follow you (or even see you) in a thunderstorm, so that must have been a good time to make a getaway.

  7. Thanks for a much needed 3 minute reprieve to focus on Jesus and my peace and joy in Him. Happy Spring everyone!

  8. Glorious. Gave me goosebumps. What a lovely song and arrangement.

    Though as an oboist, I think the soprano sax was good but it I get the feeling that was originally written for oboe – or possibly flute/clarinet. The sax was at times much too bright and loud for the tenderness of the song.

  9. Oops, I was hoping for this song, which would have been a bit snarky (but so fitting for a website for former fundies!):

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxCh2YinAjI&w=420&h=315%5D

    First time trying to embed video, so I hope it works. Lyrics, which just feel so fitting:

    Steal away, lets steal away.
    No reason left to stay,
    For me and you. Let’s start a-new,
    And darling steal away.

    Let’s steal away and chase some dreams
    And hope they never find us.
    The dreary days, the empty nights.
    We’ll leave them all behind us,

    We’ll leave behind the city streets
    The gloom and desolation
    The rain the cold, just growing old
    God knows its a hard old station.

    We’ll leave with just our memories
    And make a new beginning.
    We have to choose to win or lose,
    And it’s time we started winning.

    Steal away, let’s steal away.
    No reason left to stay,
    For me and you. Let’s start a-new,
    And darling steal away.

  10. Very nice rendition. I was always taught there are no Christians at “secular” universities. There are only a bunch of worthless liberals and evildoers. It is just another lie perpetuated by the mog

    1. I attended our local state university on academic scholarship, much to the chagrin of my pastor and other church members. I met so many Christians of various denominations there as well as people involved in groups such as Campus Crusade for Christ, Navigators and Intervarsity Christian Fellowship. Sadly I was still a bit brainwashed and did not associate a lot with those organizations branded as “apostate” by my fundy pastor and my dad as well. I look back with a little bitterness at what I missed out on by isolating myself like a good little fundy chick. My eventual conclusion was that growing up fundy does little to prepare one for a Christian life “in the world” or for relationships and just sucks the life right out of a person.

  11. The first time I ever heard this song was on a Mac Lynch CD. I thought I hated it.

    Thanks for providing a beautiful antidote! I will forever hear those haunting harmonies when I think of this song.

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