119 thoughts on “GOH: A Few Good Men”

  1. I didn’t know West Coast had jumped on the southern gospel bandwagon. Pretty soon they’ll be singing “cleaned up” CCM like PCC does.

    Now that I am done sounding like my father in law, can we all agree that any Fundy U singing group is lame at best and sickeningly saccharine at worst? If I was the coordinator of these groups at a college I would make the churches my groups visit agree not to videotape and definitely not post them to YouTube. If you set out to not offend anyone, pretty soon you will end up offending everyone.

      1. Yea. Lancaster Baptist (the church of West Coast Baptist) cleans up Hillsong, Steve Green, and Lee Greenwood. It’s funny. Very stiff. πŸ˜•

        Fundy music rarely lifts up Jesus. Too often it lifts up the Christian life and, as in this case, Christian leaders.

  2. “What this dying world could use is a willing man of God.”

    No…blech!….NO!

    This dying world needs JESUS…just Jesus!

    As always, fundy religion is all about the mannogid.

      1. BINGO!
        Cha-Ching!
        We Have a Winner!
        Boo-Ya!
        Game!
        Set!
        Match!
        William.. You are correct Sir. I Salute you!
        I agree with your statement 100% It is the most perfect synopsis of fundy doctrine as I have ever heard!
        Bravo! *standing O* 😎

      2. I know, right? I had a 3-hour theo class just this afternoon that stressed the fact that our God has no needs. Then again, maybe that’s the difference between evangelical and fundy…?

  3. I do find it very interesting that 20 years ago you would have been thrown directly into hell by the president of any fundy college worth its salt if you had stood up and sung a song written by Bill Gaither. Simply an observation.

  4. I don’t find anything wrong with this song, though his performance is awful! Yes, the world needs Jesus, but they aren’t going to find Him without willing servants doing His work, although I understand the point that @usedbefundy makes. I’m a fan of some modern Southern Gospel music, and I really enjoyed this song performed by the Gaither Vocal Band.

    Having said that, I enjoyed this post pointing out the hypocrisy of condemning Contemporary Christian music for being “man-centered”, and then not noticing that this song is all about men. A very keen observation.

    So what is the formula for “cleaned up” Southern Gospel and CCM? Best I can figure, the song needs to be old enough so that it won’t likely be heard on Christian radio, it needs to have all the syncopation, grace notes and percussion removed, and needs to be performed by individuals with very little talent or emotion. Did I miss anything?

    And let me say that I am SUPER glad that the churches my fundy college’s ensemble sang in didn’t have people videotaping us and putting us on youtube.

    1. But the Independent, Fundamental, KJVO-preaching, sin-hatin’, devil fightin, self-apointed, self-anointed, (especially Baptist) M-O-g is the most powerful force in the known universe. He can save souls, pray down revival, and manipulate his congregation to believe anything he says is straight from god himself. Yes, their god knows this man and is at his beck-and-call. This is the mighty man of gawd! Don’t let his false humility fool ya, he is dunamis incarnate!
      All Hail the M-O-g!
      “So sayeth the Shepherd”!
      “So sayeth the flock!”

  5. I want to personally take credit for introducing this song to the fundy world (okay maybe a bit of an overstatement :mrgreen: ). But as far as I know Trinity Baptist College (Alethian Singers) were the first to introduce this Bill Gaither/Gaither Vocal Band Song into the fundy circles. We sang this song at the Youth Conference at Greater Portland Baptist Church at the request of Greg Adams. Although I am grateful that we were able to perform it with more feeling and emotion than the mindnumb robots in this version.

  6. I think my mom considers emotionless singing “God-honoring” (I’m using the exact word she used describing Sunday service at an IFB church). Thus to her passionate music played with a guitar (or even drums) while the singers close their eyes or raise their hands must therefore NOT be God-honoring. πŸ˜₯ I’d like to get into a discussion with her about why she thought the service was particularly “God-honoring.” Then again, maybe not.

    1. Sigh. These guys are hitting some decent harmony. They have the talent, but their music teacher has shackled them into “God-honoring” woodenness. One of the sheer delights of life for a singer is the blending of voices in harmony and getting the “glory bumps” raised on your arms when music hits it and you know you’ve nailed it…hard to explain. And you want to move, you want to express it on your face with more than a plastic smile, to express both the message of the song and the joy of the music. This performance reminds me of hitching a fine race horse to a vegetable cart. One of those boys could be another Russ Taff or Guy Penrod (sticking to GVB here), but they’ll never know it or reach their full potential singing in this “God-honoring” way. If we cannot express the fullness of the talents and gifts God gives us, how does that honor Him?

      1. I know what you mean! I play piano and sing alto harmony, so when the harmony hits it just right – the sound is incredible! But it IS more than a sound because our words are expressions of praise to the Creator and Savior which makes it a hundred times more meaningful!

        I like your analogy of the vegetable cart!

        It’s so frustrating to me that my parents (and many others) consider it God-honoring to be emotionless and “stilted” when in the Bible God appreciated David’s unrestrained dancing of praise and condemned Michal’s judgmentalism.

      2. Well, “decent” harmony may be a bit of a stretch too. Lyricism aside, Gaither would be *facepalming* over the lack of vocal creativity. They are using straight, standard chords, and are pretty much in unison for the first two verses (save the stray note the bass was throwing out there occasionally).

        Just sayin’ is all. I have seen video clips of a younger Guy Penrod (whilst at Liberty). These guys are nowhere near that caliber of singer.

        Oh, and yeah, the song is man-centric…like most southern gospel. Southern gospel, at its base, explores the relationship of God to man — sometimes the writers get it mixed up and talk about the man and his “work” or effort for God. I could go on and on, but I won’t. Seemingly, everyone grasps that here. πŸ™‚

  7. I just remembered a funny story about this song. When I was going to church at SMBC in Morgan Hill, CA; we had a special Sunday where we honored our first responders in the community. Men and women in the fire department, police, and EMT’s showed up and heard that song sung. My dad was a policeman at the time and asked the pastor: “so what about the women who serve? God doesn’t need them?”

    It was the typical fundy way of thinking…a woman’s place is in the kitchen not behind a badge.

      1. (from Hello Dolly)

        It takes a woman all powdered and pink
        To joyously clean out the drain in the sink
        And it takes an angel with long golden lashes
        And soft dresden fingers
        For dumping the ashes
        Yes it takes a woman
        A dainty woman
        A sweetheart, a mistress, a wife

        The frail young maiden who’s constantly there
        For washing and blueing and shoeing the mare
        And it takes a female for setting the table
        And weaving the Guernsey
        And cleaning the stable

        O yes it takes a woman
        A dainty woman
        A sweetheart, a mistress, a wife
        O yes it takes a woman
        A fragile woman
        To bring you the sweet things in life

        And so she’ll work until infinity
        Three cheers for femininity
        God bless femininity

        And in the winter she’ll shovel the ice
        And lovingly set out the traps for the mice
        She’s a joy and treasure for practically speaking
        To whom can you turn when the plumbing is leaking?

        To That dainty woman
        That fragile woman
        That sweetheart, that mistress, that wife
        That womanly wife

        O yes it takes a woman
        A husky woman
        To bring you the sweet things in life!

        O Yes it takes a woman
        A dainty woman
        A sweetheart, a mistress, a wife
        O yes it takes a woman, a fragile woman
        To bring you the sweet things in life.

        1. Do I have to be dainty and fragile? What if I’m down-to-earth and healthy? Am I no longer useful? I’ll need to tell my husband that.

  8. Okay, so I get why this was posted. The lyrics are centered on men and not on Jesus, but honestly can you give it a rest? All music is flawed in some way or another. Why must the makers of this site constantly put down their fellow brothers and sisters in Christ?

        1. “if I ever came across that sort of situation”

          You must not attend a true independant fundamental baptist church then because you will come across that during almost every sermon.

      1. Exactly! The IFB preaching I’ve heard always points the finger at everyone else: “Look how shallow that song is. That music is too repetitive. That song is too emotional. That song is too man-centered.” I heard comments like that ALL the time. Yet the very same people don’t realize that their OWN music is often man-centered and shallow. If they would just humbly say, “I don’t prefer CCM; I like this style of music more” then some of us would be less frustrated. But instead they make an issue of doctrine and separation out of music which makes us want to point out where their own music fails to live up to the standards they expect of everyone else.

    1. I realize you think that culture is mostly Christian. It isn’t. It is a man-centered, apostate religion that denies the efficacy of Christ in every important way. And God, as Paul observed in Romans 1, has put that religion to an open shame by giving its leaders over to unspeakable sin. And STILL, Christian Fundamentalism defends itself and refuses to repent.

  9. What this world needs is Christ. These sons of apostates need to repent and be saved. They sing about the world needing a man who doesn’t need applause, but the ministry of Fundamentalism is full of craving the applause of men.

    1. “They sing about the world needing a man who doesnÒ€ℒt need applause, but the ministry of Fundamentalism is full of craving the applause of men.”

      Oh, yes it is. Most definately.

    2. Yes! Yes! Yes! Shout it from the rood tops! Expose the fundy cult for what it is!
      I have said it before but it bears repeating here!
      The office does not sanctify the holder of it! The Gifts given in Ephesians 4 are not offices! The ministry is what is done by the body of believers not what is done to them!

        1. Maybe George didn’t misspell anything. From Wikipedia:

          Rood has several distinct meanings, all derived from the same basic etymology. The two most significant are an obsolete English measure of area, and a term for a cross or crucifix, especially a large one in a church.

        2. Thanks JessB πŸ™‚ yeah george wanted to post today and again he mangled the keyboard. Don’t know what I’m gonna do with him.

          @Scorpio Thanks for trying to cover for george… but he’s got to learn to not just bang away at the keys and pay attention to his spelling. πŸ˜€

          He will have to thank-you himself when he finishes the emergency rectal-cranialectomy he was called in for. Seems another fundy forgot to wear a tie in order to extract his own head from… well, Think about the movie “Hancock” and you’ll get the picture.

    1. Do we hear an AMEN from the women in the congregation (who should probably wait until after church to ask their husbands what the song is talking about, of course).

      If you’re going to sing about God needing people to serve Him on this planet, then sing about PEOPLE not just people with a Y chromosome.

  10. First of all, those are some mighty well crafted tissue holders on the altar.

    Second, no self respecting fundy church would have hand-held mics; and those stage monitors are way too large.

  11. The first time I heard this song, I was in highschool and my friends’ brother brought a cd back from HAC of the Hooker family singing this song. A song about a few good men sung by a family of girls. Irony struck, and I’ve never been able to take the song more seriously than that.

  12. I have to ask this:
    If women can’t “hold” the microphone when they sing because of the “eh-hem” worldly connotation…. why is it ok for men???

    And don’t they look thrilled and “full of Joy?”

    Maybe they realize they are singing an apostate anthem??

      1. Oh, yes. Absolutely no holding microphones! We couldn’t in the church I grew up in nor in most churches I’ve been in since adulthood. It was considered worldly, like you’re trying to look like a rock star. (Well, that’s what they told us.)

        My husband (youth/music pastor then) didn’t have a problem with holding mics, and asked a choir member to hold one so she could use it during a solo part of the choir special. Another singer, an old lady, scolded him in front of the whole choir, saying it was wrong. (Thankfully, the senior pastor went to her and told her she was out of line and being really rude to my husband and needed to apologize.) It’s just amazing to me that she would ignore what the Bible says about how to treat other people (with love and respect) in favor of defending a standard that’s not even in the Bible – “never hold a microphone.”

        To readers who already read this story on another post, sorry for being repetitive!

        1. I’d be really surprised if anybody could show me where the Bible says anything about microphones at all. πŸ˜›
          The Bible doesn’t seem to have problem with speaking loudly, though, so …

      2. The church I grew up in (Hyles grad and influence) allowed microphones. They had to be held a certain way, though, so as to avoid the “eating an ice cream cone” look and any “worldly” look.

  13. Can’t believe I made it through that! The only new thing I have to add is the second guy from the right is kind of worldly. His long side burns are pretty iffy. πŸ˜‰

  14. It’s hard to picture this song being sung in contemporary worship services where people get lost in worship and lift their hands to God. Who would they be lifting their hands to? It’s not a song about God.

  15. I’m old enough to remember the Marines recruiting campaign slogan “The Marines are looking for a few good men”. The composer used this as his hook. And a clever job he did of it, too. Though I rather like the song, I do get it that God doesn’t “need” anybody. Well said, everyone.

    1. I agree that God has no need of the earth or anything (or anyone) therein. I confess that I did not watch the video, but I thought the point of the song was to address that fact that most churches are more heavily populated with women than men. Perhaps, we, who have condemned the fundies for being too literal, are just as guilty as they are

    1. Wow. I just listened to that. Not what I would have expected of Tom Jones. Thanks for the link. That kind of passion in performance is drilled right out of kids at Fundy U. Oops! Did I say performance? Wash my mouth out with holy soap.

      1. If you want passion, you should try ‘Lord Help’ from the same album. Welsh lungs meets blues roots/gospel/protest songs, that’s the one that gets me hammering along on my steering wheel.

        To be fair to the kids in the video, Tom Jones is an old man who has been performing for over 40 years, came from a dirt-poor working class background and has seen and done it all since. Trying to imitate that sound without the experience would likely come across as forced and fake.

  16. Am I the only one who has picked up on the fact that the congregation was clapping right before this song (maybe right after another?)? Surely not at an IFB church… IFBers say clapping praises the individual and focuses on the performer’s ability…. oh wait that’s what this is all about, isn’t it? I’m so confused 😯

    1. Good point! I loved the first song on the “Streams” CD from 1999 called “Job” by Cindy Morgan. It starts out: “Where were you when my night fell, pieces shattered everywhere? If I have loved You with my whole heart, time will tell!
      Time will tell!… All I have is yours! All these ashes and these sores!” It’s such a longing, sad song, but it reaches out toward God in the midst of pain and suffering and says, “I’m still trusting you.” It does seem that all IFB songs tend to exptress either determined happiness or a bland satisfaction.

  17. There is a common fundie piano arrangement for Ò€œTo God be the GloryÒ€. I heard it played many times by different church pianists and the wives of travelling evangelists. One time my grandfather, a strict Calvinist from the Christian Reformed Church heard someone play it at my fundie church. He later made the comment Ò€œWho wrote that song, Liberace?Ò€
    I later heard how Liberace would embellish pieces of classic and popular music. It was the same style some fundie pianists would embellish hymns for offertories. Who know that Liberace had such and influence on Christian music?

  18. No emotions: that’s the norm in just about every Southern Gospel song I’ve listened to. They all sound the same (horrible), they don’t mean a word of it. None of it is personal, except for the dreaded “I was there at the cross” type songs. No, you WEREN’T at the cross.

    My English teacher was telling us last night that we write papers much better when we write about what we know. I think the singers need to sing about what they know, what they have experienced.

    Which is why I love Bebo Norman. He puts so much heart into his songs. And he has a new CD out today!!

  19. I loved the synchronized raising of the microphones, nice ! This video would be much more interesting if it were edited to have the microphones raising, then lowering, raising, then lowering for the whole song. Get rid of the boring closeups. (Only mommy wants to see who they are).

    Did any one catch the “fight for freedom” line?

    God needs a few good men like He needs a band-aid.

    1. Fight for freedom to keep those ‘other people’ out of our church (restaurants, drinking fountains, restrooms, voting booths, etc.)! Not my sentiment. But I never experienced much mixing of the races or witnessing to those of another color when I was in fundyland. Oh, except sending missionaries to Africa, but we didn’t have to associate with them in that case.

  20. this problem is deeper than just being man-centered which we all tend to at some point. Their problem with music is that anything with a certain type of beat is worldly. However, this is nothing more than dualism, which said that anything that is spiritual is good and anything which is physical is bad. They basically believe that if it sounds pleasing to my ears and my body likes it, then it must be bad.

  21. Oh, and my favorite was actually the couple moving out of the sunlight mid-song. The good thing is that at least there were plenty of other seats for them to choose.

  22. I must confess to being curious about this school. It seems like i didn’t hear anything about it, then the next day everyone’s talking about it. What are they like compared to other Fundy U-types? And i might be wrong, but I could have sworn I heard Dr. Matt Beemer (of PCC fame) had taken a job there a few years back, before heading to Trinity.

  23. Um, really-I get almost tired of pointing out the Biblical illiteracy of this site , but…
    (Eze 22:30) “And I sought for a man among them, that should make up the hedge, and stand in the gap before me for the land, that I should not destroy it: but I found none.”

    1. There’s a large difference between actual biblical literacy and “proof-texting”.

      Grabbing a verse or two out of context and building an entire doctrinal mythology out of them is exactly the opposite of biblical literacy.

    2. John, I can’t tell if you’re serious or a parody. But if you want to play “proof text” you should consider your texts more carefully.

      Read the whole chapter that you cited. God is judging Jerusalem. And a few of her sins sound awfully familiar:

      “In you they have treated father and mother with contempt; in you they have oppressed the alien and mistreated the fatherless and the widow.” (v.7)

      “They say, ‘This is what the Sovereign LORD says’-when the LORD has not spoken. The people of the land practice extortion and commit robbery; they oppress the poor and needy and mistreat the alien, denying them justice. (v. 28-29)

      By verse 30, we find out that their offenses against the law were so bad not a single man was found to mitigate God’s wrath. So if you think verse 30 has anything to do with being one of the “Few Good Men” God is supposedly looking for in this song, you’re the illiterate one.

      It would be like reading Romans 3:9-12, 23 and saying “Don’t lose hope, God! There is still one righteous! It’s me! I won’t fall short!” How about moving on to Romans 3:24-27? Claim the righteousness of Christ instead of your own! Don’t cling desperately to filthy rags when you can be clothed in Christ’s own pure garments.

    3. You’ll note it’s a little after 6 PM this time

      the text was where the songs idea surely stems from–I was pointing this out as it should have been clear.

      God has in the past and does now look for men to stand in the gap. I am fully aware of the historical context and the insults and insuations by most of you are very telling.

      I cn see why you guys were so comfortable in judgemental Fundamentalism for so long…….

      1. John, there is one man who stands in the gap, turning away God’s wrath. It is Jesus Christ, the Son of God who came in the flesh to live sinlessly and die sacrificially for us. He has risen a conqueror over sin and death. He stands at the right hand of God making intercession for us. This is the Gospel.

        The man in Ezekiel 22:30 “that should make up the hedge, and stand in the gap before me for the land, that I should not destroy it?” God found him and sent him to die for us.

        Do you want to be set apart from the world? Don’t rebrand hubris under a Christian label. Abandon self-righteousness and follow Christ. There is no other name in heaven or earth by which we can be saved.

  24. “I get almost tired of pointing out the Biblical illiteracy of this site”

    Not nearly as tired as I am of your generalizations and blanket judging of everyone. Your only positive comments are when you agree with someone else who is scolding us. Kind of a like fox news viewer agreeing with what is being said on fox news.
    You add very little to the discussion. How about relating some real life experiences that may agree or even disagree with the original post or the comments? You obviously have no ability to laugh at yourself or understand the sarcasm and/or irony of the content here.
    No, you would rather just perform judgmental hit-and-runs.

    1. In 4/4 time, it is when the emphasis of the beat is on the 2 & 4, instead of being on the 1 & 3. It is truth by definition that our flesh gets into the song more than it should with this “back beat”, also called “rock beat”, also called “worldly beat”. When I went to Bible college for a year, I took a Philosophy of Music class, and the biggest thing they tried to prove was that your flesh should never want to sway along with Christian music. If you do, it’s not a good song to listen to because it appeals to your flesh instead of your spirit. There was this test taken at some secular college that we are influenced more by the non-verbal communication of music more than the words and music.

    2. And for the record, what I was taught in that class is absolute garbage. It was just to conform us into listening to music with no beat (drums, etc), no emotional expression (because you’re saying something else when you sing softly…it’s sensual *gasp*), and no other instrument except a piano and an organ. However, I did love the debates when those of us stood up for listening to Southern Gospel and the Gaither Vocal Band….about a third of the class.

    3. So, would it be correct to summarize the underlying philosophy here as, “If something feels good, that means it’s wrong”?

      That’s … um … very un-Biblical, to put it one way.
      Yes, I am aware that there are a few Bible verses warning against sensual pleasure, but there are far more that celebrate earthly pleasures.

      1. Yes! That’s EXACTLY the mindset. If you like it, you’re a sinner so it’s WRONG. If it feels good, your flesh is evil, so whatever it is must be WRONG.

        But like so many things in the Bible, balance is required. As you pointed out, there are MANY verses that tell us to enjoy the good gifts from God in life. The automatic assumption that “enjoyment = evil” does not accurately reflect the full teachings of Scripture. Nonetheless, it is VERY COMMON! (See Fundy Rules #55)

  25. Gosh, realized that we’ve had guy groups sing this in church before. I’ll be snorting/laughing under my breath next time πŸ˜›

    And for all my church’s condemnation on contemporary music, I discovered several of the specials are Steve Green songs. Hmmmm.

  26. Is it so difficult to see the good intention of this song…. I’landed’ on this site in search of the composer/origin beacuse I wanted to share the words with someone in Japan who, from what I know, stuck it out there to assist in whatever way he could (following the devastating eartquake and tsunami of 11 March)…. This man is a good speaker (orator) but what touched me was the way he gave of himself unconditionally to be there for those in need… Not just in public, addressing the millions eagerly waiting for news for behind the scenes where it made a difference. I wanted to say to him that this song so make me think of him… Nothing sinister or ignoring the Almighty Power of God. Please people, stop finding fault with songs that was intended to carry a message of hope…. Once you have grasped this you will forgive the sometime wrong expression like ‘ God needs a few good men’ we all know that God doesn’t need anything from anyone … Look deeper, listen deeper… We are all just travelling this road until a spesific day when it will be me or your last day on earth… Rather take what is good and build on it… We are all soooo human, that’s why we equally need God’s Grace… Somehow gospel always carries a message of hope … Something we all need

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